Hummingbirds Species of South Dakota

Trying to identify the hummingbird zipping around your yard?

Hummingbirds are one of the most fascinating creatures that you can find in your backyard. It really helps to know what species of hummingbirds live in South Dakota.

While the list below contains all the usual hummingbirds found in South Dakota, it’s possible to find a vagrant species of hummingbird that’s not native to South Dakota. This is rare but not unheard of.

The following legend can be used for each hummingbird species map to determine what time of year you can see each hummingbird in your area.

hummingbird-map-legend
Legend for the following hummingbird migration and range maps
Hummingbirds in South Dakota

The 4 Hummingbirds in South Dakota

male broad-tailed hummingbird

Broad-Tailed Hummingbird

Selasphorus platycercus

Order: Caprimulgiformes

Family: Trochilidae

Size: 3.75 – 4in (9.5 – 11cm)

Broad-Tailed Hummingbird Song

Overview

This medium-sized hummingbird is one of the most hummingbirds of the Rocky Mountains. Their call, which resembles the ringing of tiny bells, is a common sound during the Rocky Mountain summers. Fun fact, a female Broad-Tailed Hummingbird is the oldest known wild hummingbird in the United States reaching a ripe old age of 12 years.

How to Identify

The Broad-Tailed male hummingbird sports a hot pink gorget which contrasts with a white breast. It’s medium-sized with a a decently long tail and straight black bill. It’s a mild-manned hummingbird that is easily bullied by other hummingbirds.

Broad-Tailed Hummingbird Range & Migration Map

The Broad-Tailed Hummingbird breeds from Wyoming and central Idaho down to Mexico. Winters in Mexico and can rarely be found along the Gulf of Mexico states. It prefers mountain forests and woodlands.

broad-tailed hummingbird migration and range map
male calliope hummingbird

Calliope Hummingbird

Stellula calliope

Order: Caprimulgiformes

Family: Trochilidae

Size: 2.75 – 3.25in (7.5 – 8cm)

Calliope Hummingbird Song

Overview

The Calliope Hummingbird is the smallest breeding bird in the United States. In fact, the male weighs less than a penny. The Calliope’s species name is Greek for “beautiful voice” which is rather ironic given that this hummingbird has limited vocal ability. This hummingbird prefers habitats in conifer forests and older growth following forest fires.

How to Identify

The Calliope Hummingbird is a really small bird with a short black bill and short tail. The male sports a red to purple gorget with a white background. It’s very small size should distinguish it from other hummingbirds rather easily.

Calliope Hummingbird Range & Migration Map

The Calliope Hummingbird breeds in the northwestern states starting from northern California. During the winters, it can be found in the states along the Gulf of Mexico. During migration season, they can be found following both the Rocky Mountain and Pacific ranges.

calliope hummingbird migration and range map
Male Ruby-Throated Hummingbird

Ruby-Throated Hummingbird

Archilochus colubris

Order: Caprimulgiformes

Family: Trochilidae

Size: 3.25 – 3.75 in (8.5 – 9.5cm)

Ruby-Throated Hummingbird Song

Overview

The ruby-throated hummingbird is one of the most commonly found hummingbirds of the United States. In fact, it’s the only one that breeds east of the Mississippi River. To reach these eastern breeding grounds, the Ruby-Throated Hummingbird takes a perilous route of flying over 500 miles non-stop over the Gulf of Mexico.

How to Identify

This hummingbird is on the smaller side. The male sports a handsome scarlet gorget and a black chin strap which distinguishes it from the Anna’s and Broad-Tailed hummingbirds.

Ruby-Throated Hummingbird Range & Migration Map

The Ruby-Throated hummingbird breeds in eastern United States and prefers hardwood, pine and mixed forests starting in the spring and retreats to Mexico in the winter.

ruby-throated hummingbird migration and range map
Male Rufous Hummingbird

Rufous Hummingbird

Selasphorus rufus

Order: Caprimulgiformes

Family: Trochilidae

Size: 3.5 – 4in (9 – 10cm)

Rufous Hummingbird Song

Overview

The Rufous Hummingbird breeds farther north than any other hummingbird in the United States. It’s an aggressive species which makes it an unwelcome guest among hummingbird feeders. This hummingbird is an important part of the Pacific Northwest ecosystem, acting as a pollinator where the insects are at a disadvantage due to their cold-bloodedness.

How to Identify

The most distinguishing feature of the Rufous Hummingbird is the male’s rufous gorget that’s hard to miss. It’s a relatively small hummingbird with a short black bill. With the rufous plumage and aggressive behaviour, you’ll have no problem identifying male Rufous Hummingbirds.

Rufous Hummingbird Range & Migration Map

The Rufous Hummingbird breeds from the southeastern tip of Alaska down to the northern most parts of California, going as far east as Montana. During the winter, it migrates down to the Gulf of Mexico states.

rofous hummingbird migration and range map

How to Attract South Dakota Hummingbirds to Your Yard

Want to see more hummingbirds in your backyard?

We have all the information you need on our site to help you do that. First, we recommend you read our guide on how to attract hummingbirds to your yard. That’ll give you the basics of what’s required to attract hummingbirds.

Then, we’d recommend reading our buyer’s guide on choosing the best hummingbird feeder. Setting up a hummingbird feeder or two is the best way to guarantee that hummingbirds will visit your yard.

There are a bunch of other ways to attract hummingbirds such as getting a bird bath and planting native nectar-producing plants.

All State Hummingbirds

Want to see what hummingbirds species are found in other states? Here’s our complete list of hummingbirds found in each state:

About author
Robert has been an avid birdwatcher pretty much his entire life. Living in the suburbs he does his best to bring wild birds into his backyard. He currently has 13+ bird feeders in his yard and also raises and races homing pigeons. Robert writes part-time for Wild Yards, mostly about the subject he cares most about - birds.

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